Cryptography and Information Security (CIS) Seminar

Yupeng Zhang: Verifiable Databases and RAM Programs
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract: The talk covers the following two papers:
 
vSQL: Verifying Arbitrary SQL Queries over Dynamic Outsourced Databases
 
Xiao Wang: Authenticated Garbling: Efficient Maliciously Secure Two-Party Computation and Global-Scale Secure Multiparty Computation
Friday, January 26, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract:  This talk consists of two papers:
== Authenticated Garbling and Efficient Maliciously Secure Two-Party Computation ==
 
Peter Byerley rindal: Fast and Secure Private Set Intersection
Friday, December 8, 2017 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm
Abstract:
Yilei Chen: Fiat-Shamir and Correlation Intractability from Strong KDM-Secure Encyrption
Friday, December 8, 2017 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract:
We construct simple functions that suffice for realizing the Fiat Shamir paradigm when applied to any interactive proof. More generally, our functions are correlation intractable w.r.t. all relations.
 
Alex Lombardi: Anonymous IBE, Leakage Resilience and Circular Security from New Assumptions
Friday, December 1, 2017 - 10:30am to 12:00pm

Abstract:

Ran Cohen: Round-Preserving Parallel Composition of Probabilistic-Termination Cryptographic Protocols
Friday, November 17, 2017 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract:
Rafael Pass: Explorations into Algorithmic Fairness
Friday, October 27, 2017 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract:
 
Adi Akavia: Secure search in the cloud: homomorphic encryption meets coresets
Friday, September 15, 2017 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract
 
CIS Seminar: Amit Sahai "Why We Rewind"
Friday, July 28, 2017 - 10:30am to 12:00pm

Why do cryptographers who work on protocols keep talking about rewinding? Are they all stuck in the past? Why do we need to rewind anyway, and what does this have to do with obfuscation?

Dakshita Khurana: How to Achieve Non-malleability in One or Two Rounds, or, A Knowledge Extraction Technique for Two Round Protocols
Friday, June 16, 2017 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract: Knowledge extraction is an important technique central to several cryptographic protocols. Usually, protocols requiring knowledge extraction based on standard assumptions require at least three rounds of interaction.

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