Cryptography and Information Security (CIS) Seminar

Joel Alwen: Data-Independent Memory Hard Functions
Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Abstract:

Rafael Pass: Analysis of the Blockchain Protocol in Asynchronous Networks
Friday, May 6, 2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm

Abstract: 

Ron Rothblum: Spooky Encryption and its Application
Friday, May 13, 2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract:  Consider a setting where inputs x_1,...,x_n are encrypted under
independent public keys. Given the ciphertexts c_i =
Enc(pk_i,x_i), Alice outputs ciphertexts c'_1,...,c'_n that
Daniel Genkin: Physical Side Channel Attacks on PCs and Mobile Devices
Friday, April 15, 2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract:
 
Can secret information be extracted from PCs and mobile devices by measuring their physical properties from the outside? What would it take to extract whole keys from such fast and complex devices? We present myriad ways to do so, including:
 
Ari Juels: The Ring of Gyges: Understanding Criminal Smart Contracts
Thursday, April 7, 2016 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm

Abstract:  Thanks to their anonymity (pseudonymity) and lack of trusted intermediaries, cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin have created or stimulated growth in many businesses and communities, some of them regrettably criminal.

Valerio Pastro: Essentially Optimal Robust Secret Sharing with Maximal Corruptions
Friday, April 29, 2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm

Abstract:

Prabhanjan Ananth: Universal Obfuscation and Witness Encryption: Boosting Correctness and Combining Security
Friday, April 22, 2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract:  Over the last few years a new breed of cryptographic primitives has arisen: on one hand they have previously unimagined utility and on the other hand they are not based on simple to state and tried out assumptions.
Prashant Vasudevan: Fine-Grained Cryptography
Friday, April 8, 2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract:
Title: Annihilation Attacks for Multilinear Maps: Cryptanalysis of Indistinguishability Obfuscation over GGH13
Friday, April 1, 2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract: In this work, we put forward a new class of polynomial-time attacks on the original multilinear maps of Garg, Gentry, and Halevi (2013).
Adam Sealfon: Network Oblivious Transfer
Friday, March 11, 2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm
Abstract: Motivated by the goal of improving the concrete efficiency of secure multiparty computation (MPC), we study the possibility of implementing an infrastructure for MPC.

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